Forage! Blog

Forage! is the Society of Ethnobiology’s newest venue for gathering ideas and knowledge, fostering the ethnobiological community and movements. We encourage members to submit content from all expressive dimensions including intellectual, creative, and activist ones (e.g., art, stories, literature, poetry, pictures). Board members from the Society moderate the blog. We invite all SOE members to submit blog posts here: forage@ethnobiology.org. We welcome comments from members and the general public.


 

Reflections from the Field: Food in the Lower Galilee, Israel

By Kathleen Forste, PhD Candidate Boston University

The major challenge faced by archaeologists is translating past artifacts, features, and architecture into behaviors and activities of the people who made and used them. A similar challenge faced by archaeologists who study ancient plants is translating the preserved plant remains into larger-scale agricultural practices, and into smaller-scale meals and foodways—the everyday stuff. Did they grow cereals and forage for fruit, or did they grow fruit and forage for wild cereals? Did they experiment with recipes, or were there strict rules for combining ingredients? Did they have a similar palate to ours today and did they seek the same flavors and textures? How did their food choices and palates change over time?

Celebrating the work of the Society of Ethnobiology's Graduate Fellowship Winners

Compiled by Megan Mucioki (Forage! co-editor) through interviews with the winners

 

In April of this year the Society of Ethnobiology awarded four fellowships to outstanding graduate students conducting research in the field of ethnobiology. We congratulate this year’s winners: Josephine Tempesta (Ecological Knowledge Research Fellowship), Florencia Pech- Cardenas and Leigh Joseph (Indigenous Ethnobiologist Fellowships), and David Colozza (Urban Ethnobiology Fellowship). The work of two of the winners is featured in this post.

The Skaru:rę Food Forest

By Sam Bosco & Brad Thomas

This article is about a university sponsored event on sovereign Indigenous territory in upstate New York, USA and written from two unique perspectives

Sámi Women in Reindeer Herding Families – Identity Tied to Recognition of Work Status

Inga Mari Hætta cutting firewood with a chain saw while her daughter Inga Ellen Kristine Hætta looks on (Northern Norway in 1974). Photo: Hugh Beach.

By Ebba Olofsson

The author is teaching Anthropology and Methodology at Champlain Regional College in St-Lambert in Quebec. She also has an affiliation to the Department of Sociology and Anthropology at Concordia University. She has done research with and about the First Nations and Inuit of Canada, as well as, the Sámi people in Sweden and Norway. Her research focuses on identity, gender, health, illness, and subsistence practices. She can be contacted at ebbaolofsson300@gmail.comor through ResearchGate and Linkedin.

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