Forage! is the Society of Ethnobiology’s newest venue for gathering ideas and knowledge, fostering the ethnobiological community and movements. We encourage members to submit content from all expressive dimensions including intellectual, creative, and activist ones (e.g., art, stories, literature, poetry, pictures). Board members from the Society moderate the blog. We invite all SOE members to submit blog posts here: forage@ethnobiology.org. We welcome comments from members and the general public.


Fellowship Profile Series 3: Alex McAlvay, 2016 Ecological Knowledge Fellow

“…When all is already withered
My little babies:
"Bread! Bread!" They cry to me
Just you [weedy field mustard], with your dew drops
clean the little faces of my babes
With your little green leaves,
Kindly you give us food
…”

Trumped: What's an educator to do about it?

Words: Steve Wolverton

Our teaching takes place in society’s trenches, and we face a difficult period of demographic and cultural transition in the United States. Ethnobiology provides a nexus to many fields and sub-fields; never has it been more relevant. As ethnobiologists, we teach a high diversity of courses in biology, geography, anthropology, and other disciplines; our reach is far, and the need for our perspective, passion, and curiosity is greater than ever and growing.  The Society of Ethnobiology is a tap root for our enthusiasm.

Experiencing the Yaqui Cultural Center during the Ethnobiology Conference 2016

Words: Andrew Gillreath-Brown

The 2016 Ethnobiology Conference was just winding down with the banquet, held at the Carriage House in downtown Tucson, Arizona. Janos Wilder, our chef for the evening, cooked some really amazing food. The meal highlighted some native foods; Chef Janos gets many of the ingredients from local gardeners and farmers, some of whom get their supplies from the Native Seeds/SEARCH.

Congrats to the 2016 Conference Award Winners

Our Society awards help us celebrate the breadth of research ethnobiologists do and the variety of professionals who engage in ethnobiological work. Cheers to our 2016 recipients!

2016 Best Poster Award Winner Chad L. Yost

“Phytolith analysis of sediments from Early Agriculture fields at Las Capas”

A Thank You Note

Dr. Steve Wolverton was recently awarded the Society's Student Mentor Award. Students from the SOE have begun an annual tradition of nominating and voting for someone who has inspired young academics in the field in ethnobiology.

Ethnobiology Ethics: 3 Raw Ethics Dilemmas and 2 New Ethics Principles

The Ethnobiology Ethics series is designed for ethnobiologists to engage in discussions about ethics in the field, classroom and beyond. The purpose is to support a forum that explores our personal dilemmas and conflicts while building a community to help us all navigate the complexities of ethics in ethnobiology and be used as a teaching tool. Posts may be anonymous, as decided by the moderators (website committee). Please engage respectfully.

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