Forage! Blog

Forage! is the Society of Ethnobiology’s newest venue for gathering ideas and knowledge, fostering the ethnobiological community and movements. We encourage members to submit content from all expressive dimensions including intellectual, creative, and activist ones (e.g., art, stories, literature, poetry, pictures). Board members from the Society moderate the blog. We invite all SOE members to submit blog posts here: forage@ethnobiology.org. We welcome comments from members and the general public.


 

Healthy relationships produce healthy work, or why the Q’eqchi’ greeting “how is your heart?” holds lessons for us all.

Amanda Thiel, recipient of the 2018 Urban Ethnobotany Graduate Fellowship

By Amanda M. Thiel. Amanda is a PhD student at Washington State University. She was the recipient of the Society of Ethnobiology Urban Ethnobotany Fellowship in 2018.

Posted January 29, 2019

My Weekend Get-away With an Ethnobotanist

By Cathy Chambers

This story is mostly true, based on real adventures and real ethnobotany. As it evolved, the characters took on different and this made it even more fun to write than the usual journal entries I make on my trip.

Searching for the lost traits of an extinct crop

By Daniel R. Williams. Daniel's research won the Best Ethnobiology Poster Award at this years meetings in Madison, WI.

"It's a bit like Jurassic Park," I told a greenhouse visitor while I tucked another inflorescence into a glassine paper bag. "People ate this like quinoa almost 4000 years ago. The variety grown here vanished hundreds of years ago, but with a bit of work we can bring it back."

On returning to your academic roots, and propagating them

Ashley Glenn teaching botany

By Ashley Glenn

Doctoral and postdoctoral research takes us out of our comfort zone and into new worlds. It’s an intellectual adventure: stimulating and absorbing, connecting us to the richness of the world, to new methodology and fields of study, and the future of research. It’s consistently challenging and often frustrating. It’s that adventure that Natalie Mueller and I are in the middle of, Natalie as an archeologist doing horticulture-intensive research, and me as a botanist in the middle of anthropology-intensive dissertation writing.

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