Words: DEB Committee (Scott Herron, Chelsey Geralda Armstrong, Raymond Pierotti) and Awards Coordinator (Liz Olson).

On behalf of the Distinguished Ethnobiologist Award committee and the Society's Board of Directors, we are honoured to announce Dr. Gary Paul Nabhan as the 2016 Distringuished Ethnobiologist. We are pleased that Gary will be awarded this achievement in his backyard of Tucson, Arizona at our annual conference.  He will deliver a short talk to the Society on Friday on cross-cultural collaborators and cross disciplinary roles in our Society before the Banquet.

Some excerpts from Gary's nomination letter signed by prominent SOE members: "Gary is one of the most distinguished and widely recognized ethnobiologsts in the world. He is regarded as the "father of the local food movement" (Utne Reader) and has had his work featured in the New York Times, Time Magazine, Mother Earth News and many other popular outlets...Gary's contributions to SOE have been numerous and longstanding. He was lead author on an important article in the first issue of the Journal of Ethnobiology, was an original member of the editorial board...Gary has attended nearly every SOE conference, was an organizer of both the 3rd and 13th annual conferences in Arizona, delivered the keynote address at the 2013 conference."

Gary has worked for almost five decades in applied ethnobiology to help facilitate socially-just envrionmental movements. As noted on Gary's blog, he was among the earliest researchers to promote native foods in preventing diabetes, especially in his role as a co-founder and researcher with the nonprofit Native Seeds/SEARCH. Gary is Director of the new Center for Regional Food Studies at the University of Arizona. His newly edited anthology, The Future of Ethnobiology, will be released the week of the annual conference and includes collaborations with individuals from many different cultures and disciplines. As Brother Coyote, he is a professed brother in the Order of Ecumenical Franciscans. He keeps an orchard of heritage fruit trees in Patagonia Arizona.

On behalf of all of us, Congrats Dr. Gary Paul Nabhan!

Comments (7)

  • anon

    Congratulations on becoming the 2016 DEB, Gary! Your work is amazing. Thank you for blessing us with your insights, your words, and your wisdom!

    Feb 02, 2016
  • anon

    Pramod here from Prescott College. One of the key influences for me to come the Southwest Desert and teach at Prescott College is Gary Nabhan's prolific writing on ethnology, Cultures of Habitat, Desert Smells like Rain. I appreciate the honor and many heartfelt congratulations to Gary. Pramod

    Feb 02, 2016
  • anon

    Congratulations

    Feb 02, 2016
  • anon

    I have a mile long Canyon that is the only "Indian Country" for 350 miles along coastal California. We can trace our lineage for 4600 years. I say we have been here since the beginning of time. I am currently involved with some youth that are exploring the Native American Corn Culture. Sharing seeds. I have a lot of miners lettuce and chickweed that I would like to share. How do I harvest the seeds in order to share? Ann Marie Sayers Indian Canyon Life.org ams@indiancanyon.org 831.637.4238

    Feb 03, 2016
  • anon

    Honored to have this man in our neck of the woods! He was an exceptional part in preserving my home in the Ironwood Forest National Monument. For this we will always be thankful! Congrats Gary, can't think of of a soul more worthy!

    Feb 03, 2016
  • anon

    I have never had the honor to meet Gary Nabhan (Dr/PhD) in person but I have followed his papers and interviews over the years. I admire his research, his deep comprehensive but simultaneously real and kind approach towards ethnobiological issues. I deeply congratulate him for a well deserved award! Also thank you for all the great papers that you have produced... From the Venezuelan Amazon, a hug!

    Feb 04, 2016
  • anon

    Gary deserves this recognition more than anyone I have ever even heard of --- and in the world of Ethnobiology, i am sure there are many. However, not only is he a dedicated and enthusiastic scholar, he is the most generous man with his knowledge one could be. He cares about sharing what he knows with all kinds of public sector citizens that have benefited from his plain speak. He has inspired many to become more involved in the field. He understands what transdisciplinary research and collaboration look like and how genuinely powerful this boundless intellectual process can be as a tool for understanding much wider dynamics and issues impacting our planet and our food system. He is greatly admired and it is a fitting tribute to his intellect and his contribution to so many audiences. Thank you for acknowledging his talent.

    Feb 08, 2016

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