The Berry Project – Insight on conducting research in the Canadian Arctic

Date and Time: 
Thursday, 11 May, 2017 - 10:45
Abstract Key Words: 
Ethnobotany, Stewardship and Education, Traditional Foods and Harvest
Author(s): 
Desrosiers
, Sarah - University of British Columbia
Henry
, Greg - Univeristy of British Columbia
Student
, Participants - Kugluktuk High School, Nunavut

Communities in the Canadian Arctic are experiencing the effects of a changing environment and the development of appropriate policies may only be gained with the inclusion of communities in research. It is under that scope that we developed a community partnership to engage youth in Kugluktuk, Nunavut in the monitoring of annual berry productivity. The program aimed to integrate science and Inuit Qaijimajatuqangit through the interaction with Elders, land users and researchers. Using listening as methodology, the activities were developed holistically and evolved throughout the years. Through consultation and relationship building, this project used the study of the environment as a framework to foster Inuit youth's connection to the land, healing and wellbeing. Best practices for participatory research are few and poorly documented although central to the conduct of ethical and successful projects. This presentation will showcase a critical evaluation of the Berry Project in the Canadian Arctic.